mollyccostello:

"The Garden at Night"

 

mollyccostello:

"The Garden at Night"


 

yummytomatoes:

you go, mega slowbro

yummytomatoes:

you go, mega slowbro

open sims roleplay

cooldudebro:

cooldudebro:

image

'Oh feebee lay…'

image

awkward-fallen-angel:

prokopetz:

Why do the movies never show us this Spider-Man?

i would love to see this Spider-Man

scribbledigooks:

More Matilda drawings :)! This was just something I did for fun during the last couple of days. 

*reposted the first image*

romolagarai:

If I said you had a beautiful body would it matter in this vast, incomprehensible universe? 

I’ve been doing some research […] and I’ve found some of the most amazing untranslatable words in the non-American speaking world. Here they are, in no spectacular order.

1. Mamihlapinatapei
This is one of the first words I learned about as an untranslatable word. It’s spoken by using an ancient and primitive language from Chile, in Tierra del Fuego. (Tierra del Fuego, by the way, means “Fire, Having Land/Earth/Dirt, Which Land/Earth/Dirt Is Being This Land/Earth/Dirt”.) The word, mamihlapinatapei, is unfortunately untranslatable.

2. Toska
This is a Russian word. It means… uhhh… it’s sort of like… hm. Well it’s a cool meaning, but you have to know Russian to understand it.

3. Iktsuarpok
The Inuits only have one word for this, and therefore although we can’t know what this word means, we do know that iktsuarpok is neither important nor familiar to the Inuits, otherwise they would have 231 words for it.

4. Shlimazl
This Yiddish word is often used next to schlemiel, both of them meaning something related to each other. The meaning is something close to… uhhhh… dammit this article is hard to write.

5. Friolero
No idea. Looks Spanish.

6. The
You might recognize this word, but there is no English translation of it. It is similar to a and an but it has a nuanced meaning that those two words just don’t quite capture.

7. Tartle
Scots talk funny, don’t they?

8. Torschlusspanik
Germans use this word. You might notice it has the word panik in it which is close to English panic but those other parts mean some other sorts of things.

9. Wabi-Sabi
In Japanese culture, you have… there are these… ummm… It rhymes with itself. Like that other untranslatable word Oingo Boingo.

10. Hwæt
This Old English word used to be English when English wasn’t yet old. Once it became old, hwæt became impossible to use.

11. Cafuné
Not even speakers of Portuguese from Portugal can understand this word. Only speakers of Portuguese from Brazil know what it means.

12. L’appel du vide
There’s no single English word that captures the full meaning of this French phrase. The French have one translation of it that they have shared with us (the call of the void), but they have recently given it another more interesting meaning that they are keeping from us.

13. Schadenfreude
This weird German word roughly translates into the English word, schadenfreude.

lizziethewanderer:

This needs no context.

lizziethewanderer:

This needs no context.

archiemcphee:

New York City-based design studio SOFTlab created this awesomely colorful installation for the New York flagship location for Melissa shoes. Entitled We Are Flowers, the immersive installation is made of 20,000 translucent flowers which form enormous funnels that fill the airy gallery, complementing the vibrant, playful designs of the shoes on display throughout the space.

Here SOFTlab describes their latest work:

"Although we used cutting edge digital technology to develop this installation, we hope it remains mostly hidden in order for everyone to experience the magic of a hanging garden of flowers. We imagine this installation as an extension of the We Are Flowers collection by Melissa: technically innovative with attention to every detail, but first and foremost a design that expresses sensuality through its form and brings joy and color to the Melissa experience."

Visit the SOFTlab website to check out more of their projects.

[via Beautiful/Decay]

creatures-alive:

Covered in Pumpkin Pollen by Dalantech

creatures-alive:

Covered in Pumpkin Pollen by Dalantech

kylekallgren:

I’d like to think that “problematic” needn’t be a substitute for “evil.”

If you call something “problematic,” remember that problems exist to be solved.

sunworldstories:

by Chiara Bautista

We are absolutely in love!

princessblogonoke:

Anxiety & Helping Someone Cope. 
I didn’t want to make it overwhelming or too long remember, so I kept it to the main points that benefit me greatly when I’m experiencing an attack.
40 million of Americans alone suffer with anxiety; it’s a horrid feeling when you know someone just wants to help you but you cannot even construct a simple sentence at the time, so please share this in hope that it benefits even just 1 person. Muchos love. 

99percentinvisible:

You can manipulate images with sound in Audacity. 

This, for example, is what happens when you add echo